Celtic Revival: A review of Mario Vargas Llosa’s The Dream of the Celt

Vargas Llosa

Vargas Llosa

Reading about Roger Casement in Mario Vargas Llosa’s latest novel, The Dream of the Celt, brings to mind Robert Browning’s poem The Patriot. “It was roses, roses, all the way” when Roger Casement, the late Irish revolutionary, poet and human rights activist, then a British diplomat, tabled the famed Casement Report documenting human rights abuses in the Congo Free State in 1904. Similarly, he later conducted an investigation of “rubber slavery” among the Putumayo Indians of Peru by the British-registered Peruvian Amazon company. Continue reading “Celtic Revival: A review of Mario Vargas Llosa’s The Dream of the Celt”

The magic of realism

Anuradha Roy

Anuradha Roy Anuradha Roy. Does the surname sound familiar? But there is no connection to Arundhati Roy except the gender and the pen. And this author writes in a totally different style too. There is no magical realism here, and the pace and prose need to be savoured in an unhurried way — think Jane Austen or the Bronte sisters. Continue reading “The magic of realism”